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the national rate. one of those is chuck devore author of the texas model saying that texas governs better. matt welch also moved from california by your magazine is still based their? why is reason magazine in the horrible state? >> that is where we have spent since 1971 and it gets us outside of the beltway thinking but it is a challenge to be there. and you are right it is a new thing in california will space retract immigrants. john: but the movie industry and stuff is happening. >> california has silicon valley, hollywood, a biotech but you cannot live off that narrow band of industry forever. because of high taxes, regulation, and healthy lawsuits, government spending people are leaving. john: great davis in the '90s said we have all of this cash from the.com boom. >> he spent that cash on public sector pension promises and general spending to everybody even austerity spending has gone up. john: beyond population growth. global warning -- warming measure. >> high-speed rail that nobody wants. john: even "the terminator" the republican and i thought here is a politician quoting milton
by on outgoing president 52 years ago this woke was the role in government in solving america's problems. we'll share with you some of the comments of dwight eisenhower in his farewell address. what is the role in government in solving america's problems. you can join the conversation by giving us a call. you can send us an e-mail at journal at cspan.org. let's begin with the act two second terms for u.s. presidents have been problematic but not cursed. what history will says about how president obama will do. will obama blow another mandate. meanwhile from the hill newspaper there is this words from senator mitch mcconnell after four years of frosty relations senator mcconnell is reaching out to the president. senator mcconnell called on the president to use his inauguration speech to focus on the massive federal debt happeninging over the heads of our children and grandchildren. it is an offer senator mcconnell made four years ago but was soon forgotten. in his editorial he said given the serious nature of the challenge, i hope the president uses his address to acknowledge the seriousness
model saying that xas governs better. matt welch also moved from california by your magazine is still based their? why is reason magazine in the horrible state? >> that is where we have spent since 1971 and it gets us outside of the beltway thinking but it is a challenge to be there. and you are right it is a new thing in california will space retract immigrants. john: but the movie industry and stuff is happening. >> california has silicon valley, hollywood, a biote but you cannot live off that narrow band of industry forever. because of high taxes, regulation, and healthy lawsuits, government spending people are leaving. john: great davis in the '90s said we have all of this cash from the.com boom. >> he spent that cash on public sector pension promises and general spending to everybody even austerity spending has gone up. john: beyond population growth. global warning -- warming measure. >> high-speed rail that nobody wants. john: even "the terminator" the republican and i thought here is a politician quoting milton friedman. what happened? >> he enacted the largest tax increase at
overseeing the pre- trial hearing of alleged army whistleblower bradley manning has ruled the government must prove manning wanted to aid the enemy as prosecutors have alleged. on wednesday, colonel denise lind told prosecutors to prove that manning knew or should have known the documents he's accused of passing to wikileaks would end up being seen by members of al qaeda. lind also granted a defense request to present evidence that manning carefully selected documents he knew would not harm the united states. manning has previously offered to plead guilty to releasing documents if the government drops its most serious charges, including aiding the enemy. also on wednesday, defense attorneys tried to argue for the case's dismissal on the grounds manning has been denied the right to a speedy trial. by the time his trial begins in june, manning will have been in detention for 1101 days, nearly 10 times the maximum allowed by military rules between arrest and trial. a group of foreign and algerian workers have been taken hostage in algeria in what their kidnappers call retaliation for the french
their individual wealth and privileges to cooperate fully with the confederate government struggling to protect the interests of slave owners as a whole. and those are aspects of the book that i'm discussing with you today. but this evening i'd like to talk to you about the most important fissure that ran through the house of dixie, slavery, and the three ways slavery figured in the origin and the progress of the o civil war. first of all, the war's central cause. secondly, as a crucial source of military power deployed during that war. and, third, slavery's erosion during the war and its destruction both of those things as an eventual union goal. the destruction of slavery as an eventual conscious, deliberate union goal. so let's start with cause. as you may know, in a recent national survey half of all those people, half of all those americans when were polled deny that slavery was the main cause of the u.s. civil war. and that view is apparently gaining ground, not losing ground. because among younger people polled, those below 30 years of age, fully three out of five denied slavery's centra
fascism, socialism is where the government owns the means of production, in fascism the government doesn't own the means of production, but they control it and that's what's happening with our health care program. mackie says he regrets using the word fascism and clarified on fox and friends. >> mostly i was trying to describe obamacare, free enterprise capitalism which allows value tri exchange between businesses and individuals and it's the basis for prosperity in america, and allows innovation, creativity, freedom of choice. we're moving away from that, so, trying to let people see that that's probably not going to be as effective as if capitalism itself was allowed to work in the marketplace. stuart: that's interesting, government controlled health care. let's bring in da doctor, a specialist, as i said, you're a specialist, okay? under obamacare, what hoops do patients have to jump through to get to see you, a specialist? >> it's a very good question, stuart and there are huge concerns and issues in the medical community for doctors, both about themselves and also, about how to care
rated as one of the worst two-year sessions in the history of the united states government. well, what are we going to do differently? how is it that we only addressed one out of 24 appropriation bills over the last two years? how is it that so many important bills never made it to the floor of the senate, bills such as the replacement for no child left behind, coming on bipartisan vision out of -- out of committee? how is it that so many bills came to this floor to never see a final vote? the disclose act which would have eliminated secrecy in campaign donations. the dream act, which would have honored creating a future for those who know only america as their home. the president's jobs package, which would have helped put america back to work. the closing of loopholes for the biggest, most wealthy oil companies. those funds could be put to use, reducing our deficit or funding critical programs for working americans. on issue after issue after issue, we saw inaction. and what we heard yesterday at the start of this next two years was a call from the president for action. he said in hi
said anybody who is suggesting a government gun grab is all wrong. >> those who oppose any common sense gun control or gun safety measures have a pretty effective way of beginning gwinning up fn the part of gun owners that somehow the federal government is about to take all of your guns away. the nra said they should talk to people buying firearms and ask them why they are buying firearms. september 2012 marked the heist number ever of background checks for gun purchases in the country's history up 50 percent from the december before. >> we heard today from some of the parents of sandy hook. what are they saying? >> sandy hook promise. some say they themselves are gun owners they are comfortable talking about that but want to have a bigger responsibility about gun violence as a whole. they don't want their children's lives to be lost in veiain. they want to see change. >> here is jeremy richmond who lost his young daughter. >> we need to face and take action on hard issues. there is not going to be one simple solution. we feel it is essential to get a deep understanding of mental healt
in government today. marcia mcnutt has worked with me for many, many occasions, most notably during the oil spill. you're looking at one of the fine leaders that worked with the government to make decisions matter and make the difficult decisions. i'm proud to work with her during the oil spill and i'm proud to introduce her now. marcia? >> thank you. the gulf coast is under threats and in particular, i want to speak of those that impact life and property. it is a deadly combination of loss of natural protection, rising seas from global warming, increasing intensity and number of storms, and more people and critical infrastructure that lies in the coastal zone in the path of those storms. there's no doubt but the coastal zone is a desirable but it is a dangerous place to live and it is getting more dangerous all the time. so what is the solution? well, the good news is that research can help. let me provide you with an analogy. we know that fault zones are dangerous places to live but thanks to science we have increased more than two orders of nag any attitude the safety of living in earthq
for government. government does help a lot of people get places. we don't agree on that obviously, but -- >> dana: do you think that has s what he has been saying all along? if you compare the 2008 speech to this one, it's the same? >> bob: what i would say in this without sour grapes. in 2008 he tried to break across the gridlock and he didn't get anywhere so now he will go alone. >> eric: a lot of people on the right said he thinks he has a mandate because he was re-elected. his speech sounded like i have a mandate for the next term, the next four years. he talked about gay rights and climb change. weeping entitlement off the table. equal pay and immigration. those are things we'll hear in the next four years. it reads like a liberal agenda, top to bottom, i am going after it and getting it done. too bad, you lost, i won. looks like another victory lap. >> dana: we will get in sound bites later. the parade is still going on and the president and mrs. obama, the girls are in the viewing area. so we will continue to show you that while we get thoughts overall. when you look at the family, give me
they are afraid they will spy on them and report information back to the federal government. host: let's go back to what you said at the beginning when you talk about the politics of this. this headline -- that was in reference to what harry reid had said. some democrats backing down from an assault weapons ban. dianne feinstein but to introduce her assault weapons ban in the 113th congress. chris in washington, independence. -- independent. caller: i'm against any more legislation on guns. it's nonsense. we are back to demonizing inanimate objects. if we want to get rid of things that are deadly, ban the automobile. this is nonsense. brady.ed this with a g it did not work. it did not lower crime. that's not the issue. host: what is the issue and where do you see compromise? caller: i don't see compromise. why should this even be an issue? it is a media-driven emergency. other than that, there is none. host: the new york times front page story -- we will go next to dennis in upper marlboro, maryland, democratic caller. caller: good morning. thank you for the opportunity, first of all. the gentle
lowered their expectations -- there's always debate about what the proper role of government ought to be. i suspect it will have more of that in the coming days about what the proper role government should be -- what are our expectations? are they too low? some of my friends on the right will see the opposite -- the expectations of government are too high. talk to me about expectations -- what do we have a right to the world? >> i think it is important what they were saying about what should be done -- it is not theory, it is actually being done in countries around the world with demonstrated, proven results. every child in many countries in europe start out with that preschool. the results are that unlike this country, there is not hereditary poverty. it is proven -- this is not a theory. what you are saying about the health system is completely proven. our health system costs an extra $750 billion a year for exactly the same services that you would get in other countries. at the institute of medicine issued a report that the waste and fraud that comes from this for-profit system is 5%
unconstitutional to begin with. that is neither here nor there. the government has gotten so large and so big, they are involving themselves in everything not important to the average citizen. it is my opinion that what we need to do is to stop all of the stuff the government is getting involved in. the way to do that is through a fair, flat tax. host: we are not really talking about that this morning. we are talking about the gun proposals specifically. what kind of gun do you have? caller: i have more than one because i am a hunter. i enjoy hunting. again, back to what we were saying before. that is about all i want to say about it. i think mr. obama and the congress both do not have a clue about what is going on out here in the real world. host: adalfo, what are your thoughts? caller: when i went to high school there was a police presence at all times. the sheriffs are the -- in charge of the campus. in regards to the president's comments, i think there are far reaching and might be unconstitutional. i helped john boehner and mitch mcconnell work hard to prevent him -- i hope john boehner
and information coming from the city governments for two years against drugs and drug cartels. knowing that there is another stage in the initiative, which is going to do the state government and not the government in this new phase of the initiative they think is necessary that the american people, the federal government in mexico and the united states in which we have a lot of hope in the government of mr. pena nieto and the government of mr. obama, that they can listen other voices on a very delicate subject to security. what are we doing, local governments facing challenges that sometimes go out of our hands and anyway we have to deal with them. there is no doubt that the main concern, for instance, in my city in northeast mexico is a border state with taxes. too often, cities have borders with the rio, texas that we also have my city on the southeast part of the state and it's a strategic location. my city the city of 670,000 people. it's a big city. the metropolitan area sharing the space which has two cities, our neighbors in another city, which is my city. there is no doubt tha
like that. they keep it for one reason only -- so they can protect themselves against the government. that's what it's all about. host: "the new york times" editorial today weighing in saying the white house has a rare chance to propose and pushed through an agenda for public safety. the assault weapon ban should be renewed and tightened with a special emphasis on those that hold more than 10 rounds. offered by our chaplain, father conroy. chaplain conroy: let us pray. god of the universe, we give us thanks for giving us another day. the people's house gathers today and celebrates in its gathering the wonder of our constitutional form of government. our nation has once again achieved something so often lacking in our world history, the peaceful transition of democratic government. the major change of party in control did not take place, it is still the american experience that our streets are peaceful and winners and losers of elections move on with their lives of dignity. we thank you again for the inspiration of our nation's founders and the legacy they left us with. may the member
of government to regulate guns, but they also put a definite boundary on how far those can go. so an outright ban on handguns like we had in chicago before, like washington, d.c. had, that goes too far. whether the second amendment right goes as far as to extend the right of self-defense that the supreme court found that you have in the home to when you leave the home is another question spirally. entirely. and i think, ultimately, probably the what happens in congress is not going to be greatly affected, is not going to be greatly constrained by what the supreme court is going to allow. i think the court on things like regulation of particular types of guns, waiting periods, background checks and things like that is, will probably be willing to -- we'll probably be willing to allow that sort of thing. >> i wallet you all to know that -- i want you all to know that i've opinion sending mash notes to my wife who's away. [laughter] i know this is a big appointment for you every day, you may not see nightly news tonight, but chuck todd actually had a report on what the president's going to recom
this government. we've got to stop lurching from crisis to crisis to crisis, when there's this clear path ahead of us that simply requires some discipline, some responsibility and some compromise. that's where we need to go. that's how this needs to work. major garrett. >> thank you, mr. president. as you well know, sir, finding votes for the debt ceiling can sometimes be complicated. you, yourself, as a member of the senate, voted against a debt ceiling increase. and in previous aspects of american history -- president reagan in 1985, president george herbert walker bush in 1990, president clinton in 1997 -- all signed deficit reduction deals that were contingent upon or in the context of raising the debt ceiling. you, yourself, four times have done that. three times, those were related to deficit reduction or budget maneuvers. what chuck and i and i think many people are curious about is this new, adamant desire on your part not to negotiate, when that seems to conflict with the entire history in the modern era of american presidents and the debt ceiling, and your own history on the debt ceil
in 2010 claiming that armstrong defrauded the government by taking sponsorship money from the u.s. postal service. the justice department has until thursday to decide whether or not it wants to join the lawsuit. "politico" reports that the postal service gave armstrong's cycling people more than $30 million. if armstrong loses the lawsuit against him, he could be required to pay three times that amount. landes filed the suit on behalf of the government. there is a lot of reason to dislike wal-mart but they are doing some good today. it plans to hire every veteran who wants a job as long as he or she left the military in this past year and was honorably discharged. we're back after the break. stay with us. ♪ right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm ou
, it all boils down to there's a very different vision when you're talking about a government that takes about 23%, 24% of gdp and one at 20%, 21% like budget chairman ryan proposed. as we began this debate, they can't even agree on where we start because democrats believe we've already cut $1.7 trillion to $3 trillion all from domestic and defense, nondefense discretionary spending which, of course, that's not true. >> wait a minute. >> $3 trillion in discretionary -- >> no, $1.5 trillion is how the cbo. >> republicans will give you $900 billion and cbo -- you canted even agree where you're starting. >> that is a problem. >> true. but if -- what does it tell you that the ryan budget had essentially no medicare savings in the first ten years? in other words, you have a contest to cut entitlements, and the republicans say to the president, put some cuts on the table. democrats say the reverse, but we haven't seen them from anybody. >> she needs no introduction. that, of course, the first lady of the united states, michelle obama. she has changed her hairstyle. there will be a twitter poll
. >> cenk: fascinating to me, because insight into how the media and government interplay i guess because michael, i mean, i would -- rahm emanuel does not react like this to every reporter. why would he to you? >> i thought about this a lot in the subsequent hours and days. one of the things, there's a number of sensitive topics that kind of hit him all at once. first was the fact that he had just lost this battle with the teacher's union and at this very ritzy, high color fundraiser bragging about how good he was at raising money from corporations. the second is the super pac funding. mayor emanuel was the co chair of the obama campaign until the end of august. then all of a sudden, he became a fund racer for priorities u.s.a. a super pac. we all know, are pretty familiar with the super pac law in that there should be no coordination between a campaign and super pac and here you have a major co chair going over to the other side without anyone sort of raising an eyebrow and then once he gets there, he makes all these phone calls and raises a bunch of money. i was never able to confirm h
the government accountable to the people. few of us agree with everything that is done or spoken under protection of our first amendment rights, our freedom of the press. but as a son of vermont printers and publishers, you can bet that i have very serious concerns about the press being shut out. of course i oppose the disclosure of properly classified government information, but i think we have to make sure that legislative efforts to protect or prevent classified leaks don't ink fringe upon our fundamental freedoms, including the freedom of the press. and there i might say to the administration as i have said to past administrations, don't overclassify things. don't put a classification on everything that you do, including those things where you want to cover your mistakes. this is an open and free country. let's keep it that way. so i'll keep pushing to update our privacy laws, to address emerging technology and the internet, including the electronic communications privacy act. we have to re-authorize satellite, tv licenses. we have to make most accessible for those with visual disabilities. w
that we do what we can as a federal and as state governments to protect our citizens is primary. >> schieffer: you're going to have a pretty important job coming up here shortly once john kerry is confirmed as secretary of state. every indication is that he will be. you're going to have to appoint somebody to replace him. >> i've heard that, (laughs) >> pelley: give us a clue. >> no clues today other than it will be somebody who is aligned with the president's ageneral the, will be a good partner to the president and the majority leader, which is important. i always remind our citizens back theme the main event is not the interim appointee, it's the election of a new senator in the special election. that's what we need to focus on. >> schieffer: i take it will be a democrat? >> it will be a democrat. the. >> pelley: governor patrick, thank you for joining us. we have in the capitol rotunda a very special guest today, valerie jarrett, senior advisor to the president and i day air is the person in washington who has known the president and first lady longest, being a long-time fri
, there are international governing bodies or international authorities that said over them and the efforts are attempting to expand the population of countries that participate. generally, we see participation of more countries. host: looking at fourth graders, we see reading and math skills has improved and science has improvedun changed. guest: this particular grab it does not show everything. if we look across the entire distribution, we still lowest performing u.s. students with scores that have improved over time. there is a story of improvement among the subjects. this is something we also see in our national assessments. in the u.s., we have seen in mathematics and elsewhere, improvements for our younger students. host:tom lovelss, when you see these numbers, what does it tell you? guest: they bounce around from administration to administration. i think it is wise to take a longer view. i like to look at scores over a longer period of time like a decade or more. if you go back to 1995 and look at the fourth and eighth grade, the u.s. has made steady progress. i am encouraged by these scores. host:
is not whether our government is too big or too small, but whether it works, whether it helps families find jobs at a decent wage, care they can afford, a retirement that is dignified. whether the answer is yes, we intend to move forward. where the answer is no, programs will end. and those of us who manage the public's dollars will be held to account to spend wisely, reform bad habits, and do our business in the light of day because only then can we restore the vital trust between a people and their government. nor is the question before us whether the market is a force for good or ill. its power to generate wealth and expand freedom is unmatched, but this crisis has reminded us that without a watchful eye, the market can spin out of control. a nation cannot prosper long when it favors only the prosperous. the success our economy has always depended not just on the size of our gdp, but on the reach of our prosperity, on our ability to extend opportunity to every willing heart not out of charity, but because it is the surest route to common good. as for our common defense, we reject as false the
. that is the reason. if the government had a list of who has guns, the belief is that if a tyrant or tyrannical rule of law makers takes over, they know who to go for to take away guns. that is to take away freedom. it is a longstanding belief. this is also what informed people, touching on the immigration issue, people who did not want to have a national id card, something that will weed out illegal immigrants if you have an id card, a lot of people believe that that is an infringement of rights as well. the have centralized lists, that is one libertarian and other people began to get worried about government power. i believe the instant background checks, there are rules about how long the government to keep the intermission of who applied for a gun permit -- who has been able to purchase any firearm under that were so great about the government having the list that are required to get rid of the ever mission or dispose of it within a time. . -- within a time period. host: lloyd is joining us from pennsylvania on the republican line. caller: there are two items i want to try to do quickly. why is
of government" ... i want to have that conversation. let's talk about it. really? you're going to lay people off because now the government is going to help you fund your healthcare. really? i want to have those conversations, not to be confrontational, but to understand what the other side is saying, and i'd like to arm our viewers with the ability to argue with their conservative uncle joe over the dinner table. before the sneeze, help protect with a spray. before the tissue, help defend with a wipe. before the cold & flu season help prevent with lysol. because when you have 10 times more protection with each hand wash... and kill 99.9% of germs around the house with each spray... those healthy habits start to add up. this season, a good offense is the best defense and lysol has your family covered because that's our mission for health. [ male announcer ] shift the balance of power decisively in your favor. the exclusive 8-speed transmission and rotary shifter in the 2013 ram 1500. engineered to move heaven and earth. guts. glory. ram. the new ram 1500. motor trend's
a volley and government. the democrats typically say, well, government can do this or can't do that ask so it's really a series of arguments over the role of government and the second thing i'm curious to know about is how tough they were in a pretty partisan atmosphere. he has gotten tougher over the past couple of years with the opposition. how feist you he is he during the speech. >> things people have picked up in this run up to this inauguration is that the president four years ago in his speech came tout and he actually made a comment about how he was going to to bring an end to the petty grievances and false promises in washington. now four years later was that a false promise? >> yes. i mean, the president, i think, understandably confident and an historic election and all of that perhaps overstated what could be done. this is one place where he seen having come fiercely short and it's in bringing that sense to washington of bipartisanship and of working together and overcoming partisanship and his defenders and supporters will say oh, the republicans have been intransient and smal
by the dawn's early light ♪ country can do for you. >> the government is not the solution to our problem. government is the problem. >> a new breeze is blowing. and the nation refreshed by freedom, stands ready to push on. >> there is nothing wrong with america that cannot be cured by what is right with america. >> the best hope for peace in our world is the expansion of freedom in all the world. >> and we are ready to lead once more. >>> cbs news coverage of the second inauguration of barack obama. from capitol hill, here is scott pelley. >> good morning. the nation's capital is beginning a day-long celebration of american freedom and democracy. for the 57th time in our history, a president freely elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white hou
there's a fair amount of latitude for the democratic government to regulate guns, but they also put a definite boundary on how far those can go. an outright ban on handguns like in chicago before, like washington d.c. hackers to fraud. that is a second amendment right goes too far to extend the right of self-defense that the supreme court found to emulate the home is another question entirely. i think ultimately probably what happens in congress is not going to be greatly affect getting greatly constrained by what the supreme court is going to allow. the court on things like regulation of a particular type of guns, waiting periods, background checks and things like that will probably be willing to allow that sort of thing. >> i watch you all to know that it just not been sending to my wife while she's away. those of you getting here in time, i know this is a big appointment every day. you may not have seen nightly news tonight, the chuck todd had a report and i thought it would share that with you and then get with you, congressman. universal background check will push hard for that
. reinvigorating a mature nation means giving government to give people the tools to compete but then opening up a wide field so they do so ruak cowsly creatively. it means spending more here but de regulating more there. it means facing the fact we do have to choose between current benefits to seniors and investments in our future, and that to pretend we don't face that choice as obama did is effectively to sacrifice the future to the past. >> jonathan, first, what do you think of this speech and secondly, what do you think of david's column? >> i thought the president's speech was terrific, a progressive vision for the country. the guy won twice and ran on all the things he talked about yesterday, inclusion, balanced approach to the nation's problems. when it comes to david brooks' column, as mika was reading, i was thinking, how is that different from what the president actually said? i mean, he's talking about how, you know, what he wants to do is what he's been saying all along, a balanced approach. we have to take care of our seniors and take care of the middle class. we have to take care
of the area's conservative tide. >> in this present crisis, government is not the solution to our problem, government is the problem. >> but the most recent inaugural address was that given by barack obama. >> this is the price and the promise of citizen ship. this is the source of our confidence, the knowledge that god calls on us to shape and uncertain destiny. this is the meaning of our liberty and our creed, why men and women and children of every race and every faith can join in celebration across this magnificent mall, and why a man whose father who less than 60 years ago might not have been served in a local restaurant can now stand before you to take a most sacred oath. >> wow. at its best, inaugural justice for a presidency, what a lead sentence does for a book. it captures the duration of what's to come. a great presidency often begins with a great statement. in the day that make that statement is within moments of taking the oath itself. jon meacham is the author of "thomas jefferson: the art of power" way up on the new york times best sellers list and he joins me now. i'm here
and renewal this time around, but is the government broken? the whole system. and what can we do to fix it? people want washington and its politicians to work together. the politicians as yet have not been a i believe to figure out how to do that. but, you know, inaugural speeches can sometimes change the mood. you heard fdr, the only thing we have to fear. i remember when gerald ford said our long national nightmare is over. jack kennedy, ask not what you can do for your country. difference in how the nation feels about itself and about what's going on. i would say this. if there was a time when this country needed to hear a good speech and wanted to hear a good one, i think this would be the time. so let's hope we get a good one. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest
years? >> i hope he's learned that you know, no one part of the government, really, gets it all done. and so, he's got to do a better job of reaching out to members of congress, across both -- across the aisle, to the republicans. and the republicans have to stop buying into things that demonize the president. why aren't republican leaders shouting out about all this birther nonsense and these other things? they're silent. they need to speak out. this is the kind of intolerance i've been talking about, where these idiot presentations continue to be made. and you don't see the senior leadership of the party say, no, that's wrong. sometimes, by not speaking out, they're encouraging it. and the base keeps buying this stuff. and it's killing the base and party. 26% favorability rate for the party right now. that ought to be telling them something. you know? instead of attacking, whoever speaks, look in the mirror and say, how are we going to win the next election? >> and looking overseas, we know governments over the world will be pouring over this speech for every nuance, at this time,
. government funding and government shutdown, different story. >>> let's turn back to the big story of the day. and that is the president's push on guns and the coming fight with both congress and the nra. in addition to calling on congress to pass gun control legislation, the president will propose a set of executive actions. nbc's justice correspondent pete williams is here to help explain some of those executive actions. a big one that we know he's going to call for is this idea, pete, of basically ordering the justice department to prosecute people that fail background checks. explain why that hasn't been done before, and how it can be done. >> sure, first of all. the federal law makes it a crime for somebody to falsify, knowingly falsify information to their background checks, saying that they're qualified to have a gun when they're not. presumably, most people know when they've been dishonorably discharged from the military, whether they have the felony conviction, whether they have a misdemeanor, domestic violence conviction. whether they're a drug abuser. whether they've been judged me
been killed in u.s. drone strike inside yemen. yemeni government says the attack of four militants but the claim has not been independently verified. the attack comes one day after those of anger of the drone attacks blocked a main road linking the targeted town with the capital. the obama administration meanwhile reportedly has decided to exclude cia drone strikes in pakistan from new legal oversight for targeted killings overseas. the washington post reports counter-terrorism adviser and cia-nominee john brennan has signed off on a plan to exempt the drone attacks in pakistan from a list of operations that would be covered under newly enacted rules. areas covered in the so-called play book include the process for adding names to kill lists, the principles for killing u.s. citizens abroad, and the command chain for authorizing cia or u.s. military strikes outside war zones. the exemption of drone strikes in pakistan would allow the cia to continue carrying them without -- tearing them without a legal framework for a to two years. the hostage standoff in a jury of his ended in the
government spending, they want this town to operate better than it does. >> one note here for parents whose children are home today, a holiday from school, we're going to be on the air for many hours and if i might, have them stop by and sit in front of the tv and watch this. because especially coming off this political season, and with all the troubles we've witnessed as a nation, this is the -- kind of the best of america in action. this is something we do well and this is a living history lesson today. yes, all of us who are here to cover it love this sort of thing and wouldn't miss it for the world, but this is how an interest in history and politics can get kindled at a young age. and it's one of the great spectacles available for free from home. savannah guthrie, i heard someone say this past week that this time around, four years later, the highs are not so high and the lows are not so low, meaning yes, the crowd won't number 2 million. the history of this administration has already been made. but also the economy isn't in a fr fr freefall. it doesn't feel as dire as it did. >> as yo
the federal government have a law regarding that but i think each individual state should enact a legislative negligence act that if you don't fulfill that responsibility of having a budget, you do not get paid and you get barred from running for future elective office. with regard to the debt ceiling, here we go again. the republican party, if it goes along with this deal in my opinion ought to change its name to the caveman party and boehner and mcconnell would be the cavemen in chief, because every time we come to this debt ceiling what do the republicans do? they give in. and every amount of money that this country spends is showing it's unsustainable. we've got to reform them and get our budget in order and we've got to get our spending under control. host: lori who is one of the 65 people on facebook who has commented on this this morning says that this makes the seventh debt ceiling plays the obama's term while the democratically-controlled senate hasn't passed a budget. it seems silly -- logical to me at but he'll -- by the way, it gives an advertisement to our plans for inauguration
his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white house theater. sources tell me, ever since, he's been quoting it around the west wing. >> lincoln is the patheosis of a uniter. >> reporter: and look for an acknowledgement of dr. martin luther king's vision on the day we honor the civil rights leader, a coincidence of timing that's not lost on the nation's first african american president. now, the speech was finalized over the weekend, but the president often makes final word changes up to the very end, and this time was no exception. i'm told that he made tweaks this morning, in fact. the president, i'm told, will speak for under 20 minutes. by reading prior inaugural addresses, he decided the shorter, the better. his last address was just over 18 minutes. his favorite two past inaugurals were kennedy's, which ran just under 14 minutes, and, of course, lincoln's s
to the needs of our time. we must harvest new ideas and technology that we make our government, revamp our tax cuts come reform our schools, and empower our citizens with the skills they need to work harder and learn more and retire. but -- and reach higher. while the means change, the purpose and doors. a nation that rewards the effort and determination of each and every american, that is what this we believe every citizen deserves a measure of dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care. we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and invested in the generation that will build its future. we remember the lessons of our past. twilight years were spent in poverty. a tablet disability had nowhere to turn. we do not believe that freedom is reserved for the lucky or happiness for the few. we recognize that men matter how responsibly we live our lives any one of us at any of our times may face a job loss or a home slipped away in a terrible storm. the commitments we make to each other do not zap our nation, th
it seriously. >> on the government's role during the country's worst financial crisis since the depression. her book is "bull by the horns" tonight on c-span's q&a. >> after that, president obama and by its -- and vice president biden had a wreath-laying and president obama took the oath at the white house. here is a look at the events today. vice president of the united states, accompanied by justice sonia sotomayor. [applause] >> the vice president has asked for -- ask that we bless the occasion with prayer. so, let us pray. the profit micah reclaims did you have been told, mortal, what is good, and what the board requires a view, only to do justice and love goodness, walking calmly with your dog. -- god. gracious god, we ask your blessing on your servant, joseph, as he renews the pledge he made to his country. in all the complexities that, this world, give us your wisdom so that he can know what is good and give him the courage to always do what is right. walk close by him so that he can do justice and labored tirelessly for a more just and gentle world. empower him to be a voice for those w
around us must be cared for and the government have role in that, people respond. one of the things i started off this campaign believing was that if people knew who i was, if they knew i had helped reform the death penalty, they have provided health insurance for children who did not have it, if they had helped set up an earned income tax credit to people who really needed it, those kinds of messages are ones that would appeal across race, region, and class. >> most people with political ambitions spent years trying to gain name recognition and a seat at the table of national politics. state senator, was not just another political figure. for months to the day after his first appearance with us in 2004 he had delivered what many described as one of the most electrifying keynote speeches in american history at the democratic national convention that year in boston. tavis: it is fascinating to me, coming into the national consciousness as we were talking the other day, we were talking and it was fascinating to sit here in this hall and watch you come into the process of -- consciousnes
that all society's ills can be cured through government alone. >> cenk: as usual, i like government but not too much. there were great moments in the speech. including this one. >> obama: we the people declared today that the most evident of truths, that all of us are created equal. it's the star that guides us still just as it guided our forebears through seneca falls and just as it guided all those women sung and unsung who left theirs footprints here on washington mall, to hear a king proclaim that our inextricable freedom. >> cenk: he connected it to the civil rights and women's rights m. that was a moment today and one you should soak in. there were moments that i thought were--let's just put it this way ironic. >> obama: this generation of americans has been tested by crises that test our resolve and prove our resilience. the decade of war is just ending. >> cenk: only if it were so. there was recently a statement put out that basically the war on terror will continue indefinitely at least for another ten years but probably much longer than that, and by the way we had another
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